Pop-Up, and They Will Come – Pop-Up Retail Shops

Photo credit: hubspot.com

Living in the era of Amazon Prime has spoiled us. In a world where almost anything can be shipped right to your door in two days, just the thought of getting in the car, driving to a brick-and-mortar big box store, and wasting countless minutes trying to find that one thing you need is enough to make you want to sink even deeper into those couch cushions, let that next episode auto-play on Netflix, and put it off till tomorrow.

In this retail paradigm shift where large traditional stores are starting to lose customers to online retailers, pop-up stores are beginning to, well… “pop up” all over the place. Many online retailers are beginning to realize that a foray into flash retailing can be the ticket to earning new customers, creating buzz, and establishing a connection with your fans in a way that only face-to-face marketing can.

What is a Pop-Up Shop?

Sometimes referred to as temporary retail, pop-up stores, or flash retail, pop-up shops are temporary and/or mobile retail spaces that are placed in high-foot-traffic areas, and can sell any kind of merchandise. Pop-up stores usually last between one day and up to a few months.

Why Start a Pop-Up Shop?

  • Make sales: A huge percentage of all purchases are still made offline. Having a physical location opens up another channel for sales. Plus, the convenience of a pop-up shop can also lead to impulse purchases.
  • Generate impressions: Open a shop in a visible location with good foot traffic, and you’ll earn thousands and thousands of impressions every day.
  • Be creative: Make your shop unique and eye-catching, and you could earn valuable social shares, viral buzz, and attention from traditional media outlets.
  • Engage with customers: A pop-up shop is actually an experiential activation in disguise! Having a physical location lets you engage your customers face to face and generate meaningful and memorable interactions.
  • Lower costs: Pop-up shops allow you to have a physical presence without investing a lot of money, time, and other resources into a full-blown physical storefront. This allows you to prove your concept in a low-risk environment.

What Kinds of Pop-Up Shops Are There?

There are a lot of ways to pop your shop. Here are a handful of options available to make your pop-up store as unique and memorable as your brand.

Photo credit: trendhunter.com

1. Mobile Vehicle: Mobile Vehicles are the most flexible option. By putting your store on wheels, you can set up shop anywhere you want, establish a following on social media as you live-tweet your location, and really make a lasting impression. A custom vehicle wrap allows your shop to be a billboard for your brand both while you’re parked and on the move.

2. Street Level Space:This space is usually in line with full-fledged retail stores, meaning you get big-league exposure without the big-league commitment. However, it can be hard to get a hold of this type of space, since landlords prefer long-term tenants. You’ll need to move quickly to secure a street level space, and be willing to pay extra for it.

3. Kiosks/Booth Space: Found in malls, shopping centers, and markets, kiosks are a small and nimble option that allows you to capitalize on built-in foot traffic. With little setup and initial investment, this option is great for a first foray into the world of pop-up shops.

Photo credit: geekwire.com

4. Store-Within-a-Store:This win-win option allows you to join forces with a local retailer and occupy some unused space in their existing store. Making sure you pick a good partner is crucial – you don’t want to be competitors, but you’ll want to make sure that you share a similar customer base. Assuming you choose the right type of store to partner with, you’ll gain access to their regular flow of customers, and in return, they’ll get to offload some of their rent.

Photo credit: tigercontainers.com

5. Pop-Up Exhibit: Pop-up exhibits are more pricey, but allow for a truly unique design, presentation, and experience for customers. Pop-up exhibits can be made out of shipping containers or similar structures, or can be completely custom built.

Breakfast in bed activation done by IKEA

Why IKEA’s ‘Breakfast in Bed’ Experience Worked

IKEA, the Swedish furniture company, has been well known for its original marketing strategies, and their latest ‘Breakfast in Bed’ campaign is no exception. The pop-up ‘Breakfast in Bed Café’ opened in London for just two days in early May of 2015. Consumers were invited to a completely custom IKEA setting with the overarching goals of inspiring change and connecting with customers in a unique and personal manner.

The café, announced over Facebook 10 days prior to the experience, was a complete place of sanctuary and was in complete synergy with the IKEA brand. It housed various single and double IKEA beds, an actual breakfast café with food, and a ‘pillow café’ where consumers could choose their desired pillow. Waiters delivered breakfast to consumers and further catered to individual needs.

Consumers were able to book a space (a bed) in either the morning for breakfast or in the afternoon for a siesta and tea. By utilizing different music and lighting, IKEA was able to stimulate different human senses with the goal of changing consumers’ mood so that they could see how comfort could be achieved with IKEA furniture while being in any mood. Sleep experts were also on hand for the activation and offered advice on how best to relax and fall asleep.

Why IKEA’s Breakfast in Bed Experience Worked – The Pineapple View:

  • By creating a comfortable and memorable space solely focused on IKEA beds, emotional connections were made between the IKEA brand and the consumers who were a part of the activation. IKEA successfully placed themselves in the minds of consumers when it comes to comfort and relaxation.
  • IKEA generated a viral buzz with minimal marketing before the event. The uniqueness of the Breakfast in Bed café made consumers want to share their experiences, even for those who couldn’t actually participate.

Overall, we believe IKEA did a great job converting brand perceptions by utilizing experiential marketing. IKEA was able to take it’s brand name for affordable furniture and place it at the forefront of consumer’s minds for everything concerning beds, comfort, and relaxation, and the company was able to do it through creating an immersive experience for consumers.

Check out the IKEA ‘Breakfast in Bed Café’ campaign here.

Want to learn more about experiential marketing?

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Tradeshow floor

Why LG’s NCAA Final Four Fan Fest Experience Worked

LG recently embarked on a new experiential activation at the NCAA Final Four Fan Fest by turning consumers and fans into LG’s latest basketball recruits. The activation was intended to create buzz about LG’s newest products but to do it in a creative way that immersed fans and made them feel like they were being recruited by a Division 1 Men’s basketball program.

The experience started with LG recruits registering for RFID wristbands that would link to the recruits’ Facebook and Twitter profiles for social image sharing. After getting a wristband, recruits were taken into the player’s lounge which was outfitted with leather couches and a bevy of LG products such as a touch-screen game table, LG’s new refrigerator, LG’s Music Flow speakers, as well as LG’s new curved OLED TV’s.

From the player’s lounge recruits were guided into the locker room which featured glossy oak lockers and jerseys to mimic a traditional basketball locker room. LG also placed their newest washing machines in the locker room, which were customized to become a mini basketball shooting game, creating a heated battle between recruits to see who could make the most shots.

From the locker room, LG took recruits to a practice gym that had 25 LG G3 smartphones set up to capture the consumers doing their best dunk in 4K resolution. Consumers could then get a replay of their dunk in the film room, which featured a 105-inch LG Ultra HD 4K TV.

LG concluded the experience for its recruits by taking them through the Hall of Champions which had a custom-built digital prize wheel, controlled by LG’s gesture control TV remote. Depending on what the segment of the prize wheel the recruit landed on, they could take away a microfiber cloth, lanyards with ticket holders, compression sleeves, sweatbands, and even a $50 Lowe’s gift card.

Why LG’s NCAA Final Four Fan Fest Experience Worked – The Pineapple View:

  • LG created an immersive experience and engaged with its audience in a way that was relevant with the NCAA Final Four tournament and the company’s many product lines. LG transformed the environment so well that it actually seemed like the consumers were actual recruits being touted along through a sports program’s official athletic facility. This experience made the audience much more receptive to LG’s messaging and brand.
  • LG utilized its digital product technology to create a digital conversation at the experience and then continue the conversation well after consumers left the activation. The RFID wristbands were an excellent way to collect consumer information and ignite social sharing without being intrusive and pushy. Through the NFC technology of the wristband, the photos and videos everyone took would automatically be posted to social, which made it easy for consumers to post and allowed LEG to track all the interactions.

Overall, we believe LG did an excellent job of creating an interactive experience that excited its consumers and left them with memories that they will be talking about for several years. By interacting with its target audience in a meaningful and relevant way, LG is able to build new associations with its brand which helps in emotionally connecting the LG brand with the consumer. The connection established between potential consumers and the LG brand also lead to an increased likelihood in making an LG purchase, which is the ultimate goal of this experiential activation.

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Sam Flores spray painting mural

Terminal Kings

Sam Flores Painting

Named “The Best U.S. Airport for Art”, The Denver International Airport has always strived to be more than just a utilitarian hub for transporting passengers from point A to point B. When the Airport was faced with it’s largest construction project since it’s opening in 1995, they wanted to hold true to their love of art and keep their Airport beautiful. That’s when DIA and the public arts program of Denver sought our help to turn a construction project into a public art project. We wanted to help our clients mix up an experience that was equal parts art, education, and music. The end result? A community public art event called “Terminal Kings” that would go down in Denver history, and 3 of the largest hand-painted murals ever commissioned by an Airport.

Because this event was about art in the Denver community, we were intent on educating the public about Denver’s robust public arts program, as well as on how the art is made. Because of this, we chose 3 graffiti artists, David Cho, Highraff, and Sam Flores, to paint the murals for Terminal Kings. Graffiti is an art form that is often under-appreciated and misunderstood, and since it is also commonly found in construction sites, it seemed the perfect match for the project. With the help of local sponsors such as Icelantic Skis and the University of Denver, Terminal Kings was born. The event took place in City Hall over the course of 10 days: murals were painted live in front of the audience whenever inspiration struck the artists – both day and night. Educational presentations and talks were given during the day, and music performances turned the venue into a concert during the nights.

The results were outstanding on all channels. Over the course of the ten days and nights, 10,000 people attended the exhibit, making it the most highly attended non-permanent art exhibit in Colorado that year. The Terminal Kings Facebook page went from 0 to a staggering 2,000 followers over the course of a week, and the story was picked up by almost every news outlet in the State.

Terminal Kings offers proof that sometimes the most unlikely things can be an opportunity to create an interactive experience. Whether you’re trying to build a loyal fanbase, increase brand recognition, or find unique new ways to reach your target audience, Pineapple can help.

Give us a call.

Why Cadillac’s Experiential Rebirth Activation Worked

Cadillac CT6 at car show

Why Cadillac’s Experiential Rebirth Activation Worked

Cadillac has been a popular staple in the U.S. luxury car segment for years, but the brand has been forced to develop a new identity, in order to reach a new target market and reveal its new flagship sedan, the CT6.

The new car reveal was the perfect landscape to launch Cadillac’s new brand identity, and there was no better place to do it then during New York’s International Auto Show. Cadillac started out its reveal the night before the opening day of the auto show, inviting journalists and influencers to the Duggal Greenhouse in New York City. The whole experience began as event guests were transported from the Ritz-Carlton Battery Park hotel to the venue location via either ferry (with Cadillac-branded elements) or a Cadillac sedan. This element gave a very premium, prestigious feel to the event and would eventually become the backbone for Cadillac’s new identity.

Once event attendees were at the Duggal Greenhouse, they were ushered into the main room through sets of oversize doors, ultimately leading to a series of panels with a projection mapping imitating the New York skyline, a direct nod to the company’s moving of its global headquarters to the Big Apple. One design element that was explicitly displayed throughout the room was the usage of white; everything from the stage, to the decor, to the car, was white, signifying the rebirth and reinvention of the Cadillac brand.

When all attendees made there way into the main room and were seated, giant LED video screens showed series of 18-second videos highlighting the new CT6 sedan, as well as new colors, patterns, and motifs that highlight the brand’s new identity combining boldness, sophistication, and optimism.

The experiential activation was captured and streamed live using the live video app Meerkat, allowing for those at the event to relive the experience after it was over. The digital takeaway also served as a great way for those who could not make the event have a chance to see what they missed out on, but also see what they can look forward to in the future from the Cadillac brand.

Why Cadillac’s Experiential Rebirth Activation Worked – The Pineapple View:

  • Cadillac started BEFORE the car reveal with a prestigious VIP experience by transporting the event attendees from the hotel to the venue either by a Cadillac-themed ferry or an actual Cadillac sedan.
  • Cadillac captivated the audience DURING the event by using storytelling and one of the latest experiential trends, projection mapping.
  • By capturing the content using Meerkat, Cadillac was able to engage with its audience AFTER the event had taken place, by giving them a digital takeaway that highlighted the event taking place, as well as the new Cadillac brand identity.

 

Overall, we believe Cadillac did an excellent job introducing its new brand identity by utilizing experiential marketing. By focusing on the BEFORE, DURING, and AFTER, the car company was able to engage with its audience in many ways and ensure that there was an overarching experience and journey, not just a typical new car reveal at the auto show.

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Experiential Marketing Campaigns: Mcdonalds We’re Lovin’ It

Man eating hamburger at a restaurant

Experiential Marketing Campaigns: We’re Lovin’ It

In recent years, mega brands like Coca Cola, Red Bull, and Budweiser have been filtering more and more money into their experiential budgets. As more money has been piped in, we’ve seen these experiential marketing campaigns become more creative, more adventurous, more bold, and more extravagant. However, on March 24th, McDonalds took things to a whole new level: 24 different experiences in 24 different cities. All in 24 hours. These experiences ran the gamut from a giant ball pit, to giving out oversized straws at the drive thru, to a life-sized maze, to a pajama party. Each of these experiential marketing campaigns: We’re Lovin’ It was designed to “give the gift of joy” to the people who were apart of them.

McDonalds Experiential Marketing Campaigns

Why is McDonalds, a brand that spends billions on TV commercials, print ads, and social media campaigns, funneling so much money into experiential?

Because they know the power of creating an emotional connection. By giving people the “gift of joy”, McDonald’s reached outside of the TV screen, printed page, and radio waves and actually touched someone’s life – made them feel something. These strong pleasurable feelings become associations with the McDonald’s brand, and lead to an incredible response from consumers. During the course of the day, McDonald’s saw over 40,000 total mentions of #imlovinit – 850 times more mentions than on an average day.

At this point, you may be thinking: “that’s all well and good for a mega-giant brand like McDonald’s, but we just can’t afford an experiential component to our marketing strategy.” Good news: you’re wrong. Unlike traditional media like print, TV, or radio advertising where you pay for an audience, experiential creates your own audience and increases reach by spreading virally via social media. With the right idea, you can still make huge waves with your customers without a Big Mac Mcbudget.

Interested in working with us?

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Image of storefront branded with Nike swoosh

Nike experiential marketing went big, crazy, and interactive with it’s latest retail design.

A pop-up retail store featuring LED exterior walls mysteriously popped up on a busy New York City street corner during the week of the 2015 NBA All Star Game in February.

The giant shoebox structure changed designs as the activation went on, drawing thousands of people into the pop-up retail store. The experiential design was created to promote Nike’s new smartphone app, SNKRS, which allows consumers to customize their shoe buying experience.

The inside of the retail store was outfitted with interactive screens allowing shoppers to customize their desired pair of shoes and then share that design on social media. For those customers wanting to purchase shoes, they could design custom sneakers (Air Force 1, Air Max, Foamposite, or Air Jordan’s) and then the shoes would be given to the customer through a custom sneaker vending machine.

The Nike experiential marketing pop-up store was a big hit in NYC even though it only lasted a week long, but don’t worry sneaker heads, you can see Nike’s giant shoebox in a city near you in the upcoming months as the company officially unveils the new smartphone app in late Spring.

Check out the Nike SNKRS Shoebox on Nike’s Instagram page: https://instagram.com/p/y_GSEdAUcu/

Interested in working with us?

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Estaine branding

Using Microscopic Beauty to Fight Cancer

Estaine

Ever thought a closeup of a cancerous cell could become the design for a luxury fashion item?

One day, Dr. Zofia Wosinska, a dye chemist who studies cancer, was using microscopic dyes to diagnose cancerous cells. She discovered that these beautiful formations and colors could be transformed into unique fashion designs for high-end luxury items. Zofia teamed up with her husband, Jeremy Picker, who works as a creative director at a fashion company to bring these styles to life. Now they use her unique designs to generate awareness for cancer research through fashion items, such as ties, scarves, and pocket squares. From this simple yet powerful idea, the company Éstaine was born.

A few months into the project, the company’s mission became even more close to Zofia and Jeremy’s hearts, as Jeremy was diagnosed with stage 3 Lymphoma. With Jeremy’s cancer and Zofia’s interest in studying cancerous cells, the duo is trying to raise awareness, show the beauty in even the dark places of life, and offer hope for the people diagnosed with this devastating disease.

To generate even more awareness for the Éstaine project and cancer research the couple created a Kickstarter campaign to sell their high-end fashion items. A portion of the Éstaine sales generated through the Kickstarter campaign and the main website, www.estaine.com, go to some of their sponsors: The Leukemia and Lymphoma Society and Breastcancer.org.

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Woman handing out Johnsonville samples

3 Reasons Johnsonville’s “Guerrilla Sampling” Idea is Awesome

Johnsonville Guerrilla Sampling

If your product or service is something that has to be tasted or tried in order for your customers to fully appreciate it, samples are probably already an important part of your marketing strategy. We’ve all seen the glorified lunch lady handing out samples at a grocery store, Costco, or sometimes even at a fair or farmers market if the brand is really adventurous. Recently however, Johnsonville (the company that makes breakfast sausages), took sampling to another level by creating a “guerrilla sampling” campaign. For three days each week, brand ambassadors distributed samples of Johnsonville products to commuters on Atlanta’s MARTA rail system.

Here are three reasons this is a great idea:

It allows you to be in the right place, at the right time

People who take the train in the morning are probably on their way to work. Most of us are in a rush on our morning commute, and maybe didn’t even have time to find something to eat for breakfast. So there you are: feeling the pressure of the 9-5 grind, feeling like you never have time to eat a decent breakfast anymore, and then BAM! You’re served a hot and tasty sausage sandwich. It’s much more likely that someone will be eager to try a sample in this case instead of if they were wandering through the aisles in the grocery store.

It’s highly shareable

People love to whip out their smartphones and take videos or pictures of anything even remotely out of the ordinary. Johnsonville not only earned the impressions of those people who got a taste of their product on the rail system, they also surely got some great exposure through snapchats, Instagram posts, Facebook statuses, and tweets of people telling their friends: “You’ll never guess what happened on my way to work!” Also, don’t forget about the exposure from good old fashioned word of mouth.

It creates lasting impressions

People don’t expect to smell freshly cooked breakfast sausage in the train station on their ride to work. It’s tapping into the cardinal rule of creative guerrilla marketing: things that are foreign or unexpected are extremely memorable.

There’s also an almost pavlovian effect here: There’s nothing that would make me want to buy Johnsonville’s products more than looking forward to my sample every day for almost a week, and then having to deal with its sudden disappearance.

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